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Idea Log

a record of ideas I've come up with

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Hardware hacks

Replacing cordless power drills batteries with lithium batteries

  • Lithium batteries have great capacity, light weight, long lifetimes.
  • NiMH batteries are OK-ish, medium capacity, good voltage levels over discharge level, heavy weight, medium lifetimes
  • NiCd batteries suck. low capacity, normal weight, low lifetimes, bad for environment.

So I replaced my old battery packs with lithium-ion batteries from old laptop batteries.

Dead laptop batteries often have only one or two dead cells or have been left uncharged for too long.  So I measure each cell and if the battier is above 2V I keep it, lower I recycle it.  Mixing Li-Ion batteries is not the best solution but I had to use various old laptop batteries, and it works.  Possible problems with mixing batteries are if 2 different batteries with different capacities, the lower capacity could discharge below minimum level and cause damage, lowering the capacity even more.  Not the end of the world.

Drills I have modified

Skil 2585

  • Voltage Rating: 14.4V
  • Original batteries: DW9061
    • C-cell, NiCd
    • Capacity: 1.2Ah
    • Load: forgot to measure before I recycled them
    • Cost: $50
  • New homemade battery configuration
    • 8-cell Lithium-Ion 18650
    • Configuration: 4S-2P
      • 4 is series gets pretty close to the voltage rating
      • 2 in parallel  @ 2C, with new batteries, max recommended current would be 16A
    • Voltage: 14.8V (12-16.8V)
    • Capacity: 4Ah (2Ah with my used batteries)
    • Measured Load: forgot to measure
    • Protection circuit: 15A 4S Li-ion Charger Protection Board
      • Max average current: 15A(Natural cooling 10.A, add heat sink 15A, the maximum instantaneous current 30A)
    • Add-on: 4S Lithium Capacity meter indicator/display

 

Dewalt DW952

  • Voltage Rating: 9.6V
  • Original batteries: DW9061
    • 8-cel, C-cell, NiCd
    • Capacity: 1.7Ah(DW9061 XR)
    • Load: forgot to measure before I recycled them
    • Cost: $50
  •  New homemade battery configuration
    • 6-cell Lithium-Ion 18650
    • Configuration: 2S-3P
      • I was worried that 3 in series would make the voltage too high (9-12.6V)
      • I decided to put 3 in parallel to supply the high current @ 2C max recommended current would be 18A
    • Voltage: 7.4V (6-8.4V)
    • Capacity: 6Ah (3Ah with my used batteries)
    • Measured Load: 5A(no load), 20A(extreme load)
    • Protection circuit: 2 S 15A 7.4 V Li-ion  Battery Protection Board
      • Maximum continuous discharge current: 15A
      • Over current protection: 20.8A
    • Add-on: 4S Lithium Capacity meter indicator/display

 

Batteries used

LGABD11865

  • Nominal Voltage: 3.7V
  • Size: 18650 (Cylindrical)
  • Capacity: 3000 mAh
  • Chemistry: Lithium Ion (Rechargeable Li-Ion)
  • Brand: LG

 

LGABC11865

  • Nominal Voltage: 3.7V
  • Size: 18650 (Cylindrical)
  • Capacity: 2800 mAh
  • Chemistry: Lithium Ion (Rechargeable Li-Ion)
  • Brand: LG
  • Max Charging current: 2.7A
  • Max Discharging current: 5A

Sony US18650GR (G6 date code)

 

 

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Power strip controlled by computers on/off status

So i wanted to have some of my peripherals turn off when my computer is off. Speakers and lamp and such.  I made a simple one using USB power to switch on/off a power strip but modern PCs have USB powered on always.  So without some intelligent circuitry, this will no longer work.

So what i use now is a power strip controlled by the PCs power supply.  Essentially I have a relay that switches when the computers power supply is on.  But with some added protection, so I wont damage anything inside the PC.

Description:

The PCs power supplies “12V” output is hooked into an isolation DC-DC converter, then a linear regulator.  This protects the PC if there is a short or if the external wires touch a high voltage by accident.  I put these all on a card to make it pretty, and more convenient.  After the protection circuit a cable connects to the power strip.  Inside the power strip a relay is controls the hot line of the power strip.  I used a small power strip to save space and to remind me not to plug too much into it.

 

Parts List:

  • Molex 8981 – Disk Drive Power Connector
  • VB1212LS-1W – Isolated 12V-12V DC-DC converter
    • VB1212LS datasheet
    • You can use any isolated DC-DC converter that allows Vin=12V and Vout>6.5V and max power > 0.1W
  • 5V linear regulator
    • You can use any 5V linear regulator or LDO that allows Vin=12V
  • 5V relay
    • You can used any 5V relay with switch voltage>=110Vac
    • Note that the max switch current of the relay is the max current you can use on the power strip
    • I used a 4.5V relay, because that is what I had.  If you use a 5V relay remove the diode, “diode1”
  • diode
    • Can use any switching or rectifier diode. I used 1N914
  • 1uF capacitors
    • I used 1uF electrolytic capacitors
  • Power strip

 

Schematic:

power_strip_on_when_computer_on_schem

 

Photos:

computer_powered_switch_w_anotate

computer_powered_switch_top_w_anotate

computer_controlled_power_strip

hacking bluetooth headphones by adding a 3.5mm headphone jack

bluetooth_headphones_openSo i go through ear buds like crazy.  Cheap ones last me two weeks to a month, high end ones last me 6-12 month.  I though this may be because of snags. So i bought a cheap set of bluetooth headphones.  It lasted around 90 days.  the hardware works fine, but the wires to the ear buds wore out.

I liked the functionality of the bluetooth thing so i decided to add a headphone jack to it so i can plug in any headphones i want.

 

Components:

  • bluetooth head phones
  • 3.5mm TRRS(4-pole) headphone jack

 

Steps:

  • opening it up
  • removing the ear bud wires
  • drilled holes for the headphone jack
  • soldered wires from board to jack
    • [R+] to [right]
    • [R-] to [ground]
    • [L+] to [left]
  • added so glue to re-enforce the wires contacts
  • closed it up and added some glue to hold it together
  • plug in a set of headphones
  • zip tie excess wire from plug to buds

 

Comments:

  • test with 3-pole and 4-pole headphone jacks before closing it up
  • use thin wire so it doesn’t pull off the PCB, I used 30AWG wire wrap wire.
  • be careful not to pull off contact from PCB.  I used super glue to re-enforce contact

 

Useful info:

trrs-diagram2
from  CableChick
4-pole-3-5mm_jack-dimensions-mklec-350x350
Example of a 3.5mm TRRS 4-pole cellphone headphone jack, from mklec

 

 

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